How it works

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How it works

A simple solution to tedious tasks

Source text

Raw text can contain inline tags with attrs⁠: abbr⁠, time⁠, b⁠, strong⁠, em⁠, i⁠, code⁠, a⁠, strike⁠, s and span⁠.

The limits of algorithmic predictions are abundantly clear in the Niemann mess. Chess observers have tried to use them to evaluate Niemann’s play, only to fall into a morass of argument. One analysis finds that his play falls within an unsuspicious range while another finds his performances improbable.

At the end of the day when we’re talking about looking at the games, there are probably only a handful of people in the world who can say whether these moves look like they’re human, or not human,” Nakamura said. “There’s a limited pool of people who can have opinions that are legitimate. That also makes it very difficult. There’s really no agreement.”

Carlsen has called for better methods of detection and added, “I hope that the truth on this matter comes out, whatever it may be.” But the chess world may discover that machine intelligence or tech engines don’t solve its new problems any more efficiently than an age-old human practice: the honor code, the development of conscience, which solves problems before they begin. As the Russian chess grandmaster Alexander Grischuck once remarked about the explosion of chess online and the proliferation of tools with which to cheat, ultimately, “Everything rests on decency.”

Posted on https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2022/09/27/magnus-carlsen-hans-niemann-chess-cheating-controversy/, by S. Jenkins

Extracting custom markup

Save list of custom tags⁠:

[
  {
    "params": {
      "type": "strong"
    },
    "body": "Niemann’s",
    "range": "131...140"
  },
  {
    "params": {
      "type": "emphasis"
    },
    "body": "At the end of the day",
    "range": "306...327"
  },
  {
    "params": {
      "type": "bold"
    },
    "body": "Alexander Grischuck",
    "range": "1072...1091"
  },
  {
    "params": {
      "href": "https://www.washingtonpost.com/people/sally-jenkins/",
      "type": "link"
    },
    "body": "S. Jenkins",
    "range": "1357...1367"
  }
]

Tokenizing

We have developed our own Natural Language Processor for extract simple forms and word groups with saving punctuation into source text⁠.

Example of tokenization of simple text forms (molecules):

001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012. 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023, 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031. 032 033 034 035 036 037 038 039 040 041 042 043 044 045 046 047 048. “049 050 051 052 053 054 055 056 057 058 059 060 061 062, 063 064 065 066 067 068 069 070 071 072 073 074 075 076 077 078 079 080 081 082 083, 084 085 086,” 087 088. “089 090 091 092 093 094 095 096 097 098 099 100 101. 102 103 104 105 106 107. 108 109 110 111.” 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121, “122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131, 132 133 134 135.” 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160: 161 162 163, 164 165 166 167, 168 169 170 171 172 173. 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197, 198, “199 200 201 202.” 203 204 205, 206 207

Example extracting molecules from text⁠:

The limits of algorithmic predictions are abundantly clear in the Niemann mess⁠. Chess observers have tried to use them to evaluate Niemann’s play⁠, only to fall into a morass of argument⁠. One analysis finds that his play falls within an unsuspicious range while another finds his performances improbable⁠. “⁠At the end of the day when we’re talking about looking at the games⁠, there are probably only a handful of people in the world who can say whether these moves look like they’re human⁠, or not human⁠,” Nakamura said⁠. “⁠There’s a limited pool of people who can have opinions that are legitimate⁠. That also makes it very difficult⁠. There’s really no agreement⁠.” Posted on https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2022/09/27/magnus-carlsen-hans-niemann-chess-cheating-controversy/⁠, by S. Jenkins

Extracting sentences

We extract sentences for perfect text analysis with saving punctuation between sentences.

The limits of algorithmic predictions are abundantly clear in the Niemann mess. Chess observers have tried to use them to evaluate Niemann’s play, only to fall into a morass of argument⁠. One analysis finds that his play falls within an unsuspicious range while another finds his performances improbable. “⁠At the end of the day when we’re talking about looking at the games, there are probably only a handful of people in the world who can say whether these moves look like they’re human, or not human,” Nakamura said. “⁠There’s a limited pool of people who can have opinions that are legitimate⁠. That also makes it very difficult. There’s really no agreement⁠.⁠” Posted on https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2022/09/27/magnus-carlsen-hans-niemann-chess-cheating-controversy/, by S. Jenkins

Link processing

Source text:

Posted on https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2022/09/27/magnus-carlsen-hans-niemann-chess-cheating-controversy/, by S. Jenkins

Generate links:

Posted on https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2022/09/27/magnus-carlsen-hans-niemann-chess-cheating-controversy/⁠, by S. Jenkins

Generate and shorten hyperlinks:

Posted on washingtonpost.com⁠, by S. Jenkins

Grouping molecules

Depending on the type of user device⁠, line length and other features of the text⁠, the Typograph selects the optimal typography options, for example⁠:

sentence_first_word_breake_min_length: 9,
group_first_word_breake_min_length: 7,
sentence_last_word_breake_min_length: 9,
group_last_word_breake_min_length: 7,
normal_brake_min_word_length: 3,
normal_brake_min_word_length_soft: 4,
max_subgoup_length_for_normal_string: 50,
max_subgoup_length_for_short_string: 25

For each type of user's device⁠, the Typograph works in two modes⁠: the mandatory combination of words into groups (⁠nobr groups⁠) and the combination of words into groups when the conditions for presenting the content allow it (nobrsoft groups).

After extracting the molecules and calculating the parameters of the words⁠, the Typograph combines the words into groups⁠. An example of Typograph's work in soft mode when nobr groups are placed⁠:

The limits of algorithmic predictions are abundantly clear in the Niemann mess⁠. Chess observers have tried to use them to evaluate Niemann’s play⁠, only to fall into a morass of argument⁠. One analysis finds that his play falls within an unsuspicious range while another finds his performances improbable.

“⁠At the end of the day when we’re talking about looking at the games⁠, there are probably only a handful of people in the world who can say whether these moves look like they’re human⁠, or not human⁠,” Nakamura said. “⁠There’s a limited pool of people who can have opinions that are legitimate⁠. That also makes it very difficult. There’s really no agreement⁠.”

Carlsen has called for better methods of detection and added⁠, “⁠I hope that the truth on this matter comes out⁠, whatever it may be⁠.” But the chess world may discover that machine intelligence or tech engines don’t solve its new problems any more efficiently than an age-old human practice: the honor code⁠, the development of conscience⁠, which solves problems before they begin⁠. As the Russian chess grandmaster Alexander Grischuck once remarked about the explosion of chess online and the proliferation of tools with which to cheat⁠, ultimately, “Everything rests on decency⁠.”

Posted on washingtonpost.com⁠, by S. Jenkins

An example of Typograph's work in hard mode when nobrsoft groups are placed⁠:

The limits of algorithmic predictions are abundantly clear in the Niemann mess⁠. Chess observers have tried to use them to evaluate Niemann’s play⁠, only to fall into a morass of argument⁠. One analysis finds that his play falls within an unsuspicious range while another finds his performances improbable.

“⁠At the end of the day when we’re talking about looking at the games⁠, there are probably only a handful of people in the world who can say whether these moves look like they’re human⁠, or not human⁠,” Nakamura said. “⁠There’s a limited pool of people who can have opinions that are legitimate⁠. That also makes it very difficult. There’s really no agreement⁠.”

Carlsen has called for better methods of detection and added⁠, “⁠I hope that the truth on this matter comes out⁠, whatever it may be⁠.” But the chess world may discover that machine intelligence or tech engines don’t solve its new problems any more efficiently than an age-old human practice: the honor code⁠, the development of conscience⁠, which solves problems before they begin⁠. As the Russian chess grandmaster Alexander Grischuck once remarked about the explosion of chess online and the proliferation of tools with which to cheat⁠, ultimately, “Everything rests on decency⁠.”

Posted on washingtonpost.com⁠, by S. Jenkins

What's more⁠, you can use the Typograph in responsive mode and set CSS breakpoints yourself to change the mode depending on your preference. Check out the demo below⁠!

.some-content-block {
    @media screen and (max-width: 749px) {
        .nobr {
            white-space: normal;
        }
    }

    @media screen and (min-width: 750px) {
        .nobr {
            white-space: nowrap;
        }
    }

    @media screen and (max-width: 999px) {
        .nobrsoft {
            white-space: normal;
        }
    }

    @media screen and (min-width: 1000px) {
        .nobrsoft {
            white-space: nowrap;
        }
    }
}

For best result you can use CSS Container Queries⁠, it already works natively in some browsers⁠.

Live demo of typograph modes: untypographed⁠, soft⁠, hard or adaptive

The limits of algorithmic predictions are abundantly clear in the Niemann mess. Chess observers have tried to use them to evaluate Niemann’s play, only to fall into a morass of argument. One analysis finds that his play falls within an unsuspicious range while another finds his performances improbable.At the end of the day when we’re talking about looking at the games, there are probably only a handful of people in the world who can say whether these moves look like they’re human, or not human,” Nakamura said. “There’s a limited pool of people who can have opinions that are legitimate. That also makes it very difficult. There’s really no agreement.”Posted on https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2022/09/27/magnus-carlsen-hans-niemann-chess-cheating-controversy/, by S. Jenkins
The limits of algorithmic predictions are abundantly clear in the Niemann mess⁠. Chess observers have tried to use them to evaluate Niemann’s play⁠, only to fall into a morass of argument⁠. One analysis finds that his play falls within an unsuspicious range while another finds his performances improbable.“⁠At the end of the day when we’re talking about looking at the games⁠, there are probably only a handful of people in the world who can say whether these moves look like they’re human⁠, or not human⁠,” Nakamura said. “⁠There’s a limited pool of people who can have opinions that are legitimate⁠. That also makes it very difficult. There’s really no agreement⁠.”Posted on washingtonpost.com⁠, by S. Jenkins